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GETTING SOME

Roadside stands —
often just metal barrels on wheels — dispense good jerk chicken and pork on the run.

Wrapped simply in foil or paper, the tender meat falls apart in one's fingers, exactly how it is meant to be eaten.

For some extra zing, ask for a final shot of jerk sauce.

 

 

 

 

 

DESTINATION JAMAICA

Designed and produced ads for the 2004 issue. Managed editorial for the 2005 issue. Wrote features for the 2006/07 issue, including the three samples shown below. Nobody got a byline. The 232-page in-room visitor guides were published by Ulrich Communications for the Jamaica Hotel & Tourist Association and Jamaica Tourist Board.

 


 

ARTS

The fine art of nation building

Did Jamaican art cause independence,
or did independence cause Jamaican art?

Suppose a people were busy throwing off five hundred years of conquest, slavery, colonialism, and oppression. Suppose they were tasting self-determination for the first time. What sort of art would they create?

In Jamaica, they started by immortalizing real Jamaicans living real lives in real dignity.

Download a PDF file of the story as designed, Destination Jamaica 2006/07, Welcome section, feature. Layout by Jerry "JP" Price of CyberPeak.com.

 


 

HISTORY

Freedom fighters

The Maroons just said ‘no’
to slavery, and made it stick.

This year Portia Simpson Miller became the first strong woman to lead Jamaica as prime minister. She was not, however, the first strong woman to lead Jamaicans. That title went to Nanny of the Maroons more than two hundred years ago.

In the 18th century, Nanny inspired her little band of African freedom fighters to stand up to the slave trade, refuse to be victims, and make it stick. This is the heroic story of the ones that got away, the Maroons.

Download a PDF file of the story as designed, Destination Jamaica 2006/07, Welcome section, feature. Layout by Jerry "JP" Price of CyberPeak.com.

 


 

CUISINE

Jerked around

Like all good inventions, necessity
was the mother of jerk seasoning.

Jerk, the legendary flavor of Jamaica — spicy hot, mildly smoky, a little sweet — began in the 16th century as a way to protect the food supply. From the Spanish word cahrqui, jerk actually means preserved or dried meat.

Runaway slaves called Maroons lived high in the mountains of Portland to evade their would-be captors. They hunted far and wide for wild pigs, which sometimes spoiled before they got home. So the hunters gathered local spices, dug holes in the earth, burned indigenous pimento wood, and smoked the pork as soon as they caught it.

A few hundred years later, jerk became popular street food. Maroons would bring it down from the hills to sell it in the towns. Today jerk is a cuisine recognized around the world, adding a Jamaican kick to chicken, lamb, pork, fish, even vegetables.

Download a PDF file of the story as designed, Destination Jamaica 2006/07, Welcome section, feature. Layout by Jerry "JP" Price of CyberPeak.com.

 


 

DISPLAY ADS

Designed dozens of ads for hotels, resorts, shops, attractions, and restaurants, including this original photo art for an Evita's Italian restaurant ad in Ocho Rios.

 

 


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Banner illustration by Jeff Borg